Skip to content Skip to navigation

The Morning Show

PROGRAM NOTE:  TODAY'S MORNING SHOW BROADCAST IS PARTIALLY PRE-EMPTED IN ORDER TO BRING YOU NPR'S LIVE COVERAGE OF THE MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR SUPREME COURT JUSTICE RUTH BADER GINSBURG, WHICH BEGINS AT 8:30.

Broadcast today:   From 2018,  Don Winslow, author of "The Force," in which Winslow was able to draw upon his real-life experience in the field of law enforcement.  

Available on today's Morning Show podcast:  Marc Cushman, author of a trilogy of new books titled "These Are The Voyages: Gene Rodenberry and Star Trek in the 1970s."  This was the decade when the Star Trek phenomenon was truly born.  In this interview, we talk about the first Star Trek conventions as well as the animated series which represented the franchise's first return to the screen after the cancellation of the original series in 1969.   

Tentatively Scheduled: Kenosha mayor John Antaramian. Also: Jo Frost,  television's Super Nanny, talks about her new show on Lifetime television. 

PROGRAM CHANGE:   Todd D. Snyder, author of "Bundini: Don't Believe the Hype,"  a celebration of the life of the colorful and controversial Drew "Bundini" Brown, who was one of the most significant men in the corner of Muhammad Ali for the vast majority of his most important fights - and the man who actually coined the phrase "float like a butterfly, sting like a bee."   <The interview scheduled for today with the author of "The Wax Pack" will air next week.  The change was made so WGTD could join NPR's live coverage of the Ruth Bader Ginsburg event this morning.>

Lorene Cary, author of "Ladysitting:  My Year with Nana at the End of Her Century." 

Richard Stein, Director of Law Enforcement Training at Gateway Technical College, and Raymond Clark, an instructor in GTC's Law Enforcement Academy. 

Beth Bender and Pasquale Laurino talk about the Racine Symphony's year-long project involving Vivaldi's "Four Seasons."

Nan Calvert - with Megan Severson, state director of Wisconsin Environment,  a powerful advocacy group on behalf of various statewide environmental issues and concerns. 

Jim Hock, author of "Father on the Line: a Memoir." 

Bruce Boise, author of "Cold Comfort: One Man's Struggle to Stop the Illegal Marketing of Opioid Drugs and Save Lives."  

Part One: Kenosha's own Nick Daly, now a music theater major at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, talks about winning first place in Playbill Magazine's Search for a Star Contest. (He topped a field of 2,700 singers from across the country.)  Part Two: Tom Miller, author of "How I Learned English: 55 Accomplished Latinos Recall Lessons in Language and Life."  

Part One:  Ellis Cose, author of "Bone to Pick:  Of Forgiveness, Reconciliation, Reparation, and Revenge."   Part Two:  "The Game,"  by Stuart Ray Clarke- a book celebrating the importance of soccer in Great Britain.  

Dr. Bryan Albrecht, president of Gateway Technical College and Mary Burgoon, from Rockwell Automation.

Tom Cooper, author of "Doing the Right Thing:  12 Portraits in Moral Courage." 

Dr. Michael Hansen, a member of the Political Science faculty at the University of Wisconsin- Parkside.

Debby Irving, author of "Waking Up White and Finding Myself in the Story of Race." 

Part One:  CBS News Journalist Wesley Lowery, with "60 in 6," an off-shoot of "60 Minutes,"  talks about his recent visit to Kenosha to meet relatives of Jacob Blake and to interview Raysean White, the man who took the video of the shooting.  Part Two:  We get a preview of a brand new podcast called "Read More Plays."  We speak with co-hosts Jennifer Sassaman and Richard Frederick Evans ... and sound engineer Sam Fitzwater Butchart.   The first episode of the podcast will be shared with the public on Monday, September 7th.  

Sarah Kovner, author of "Prisoner of the Empire: Inside Japanese POW Camps." 

Dr. Debra Ford, Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside.

Dr. John Swallow, President of Carthage College.

Margaret L. Anderson, author of "Getting Smart about Race: An American Conversation."

Jennifer Cobbina, author of 'Hands Up! Don't Shoot!  Why the Protests in Ferguson and Baltimore Matter, and How They Changed America."  

Dr. Art Cyr,  Clausen Distinguished Professor at Carthage, pays his monthly visit to the program to offer his analysis of current events and issues. 

Dr. Bryan Albrecht, president of Gateway Technical College

Dr. Jerald Mast, chair of the political science department at Carthage College,  offers his analysis of the recently completed Democratic National Convention- and looks ahead to the Republic National Convention. 

We speak with a resident of Marion, Iowa - Peter Ylvasaker - about the devastating storm that tore through central Iowa on August 10th.

Marc Cushman talks about Star Trek. 

Nan Calvert with Chris Litzau, Director of the Great Lakes Community Conservation Corps, talking about a new initiative for improving stormwater runoff in Racine County. 

“This is your brain on food: An indispensable guide to the surprising foods that fight depression, anxiety, PTSD, OCD, ADHD, and more"  by Dr. Uma Naidoo.  

Brad Ricca, author of “Olive the Lionheart: Lost Love, Imperial Spies, and One Woman’s Journey into the Heart of Africa.” 

Dr. Leslie Cameron, Professor of Psychology at Carthage, talks about how testing a person’s sense of smell can be helpful in determining if someone perhaps has COVID-19. 

Howard Burman, author of "Mutt's Dream: Making the Mick."

We receive COVID updates from Margaret Gesner,  Director of the Racine County Health Department - and Carlo Nevicosi, Deputy Director of the Walworth County Health Department. 

Racine County Executive Jonathan Delagrave talks about his personal encounter with COVID-19.

Bradley Garrett, author of "Bunker: Building for the End Times."  Garrett immersed himself in the world of doomsday preppers. 

Ellyn A. Lem, author of "Gray Matters: Finding Meaning in the Stories of Later Life." 

Elizabeth Englander, author of "25 Myths of Bullying and Cyberbullying."  Part Two:  Nick Huff and Kaila Bingen give information on a virtual opera concert coming up on Sunday, August 9th. 

Dr. James Ripley,  Director of Instrumental Activities at Carthage College

Melba Beals, one of the Little Rock Nine,  and author of "March Forward, Girl:  From Young Warrior to Little Rock Nine." Also:  ABC's Dan Harris, author of "Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics: a 10% Happier How-to Book." 

Part 1:  Edward Goldberg, author of "Why Globalization works for America: Now Nationalist Trade Policies are Destroying our Country."   Part 2:  Dan P. McAdams, author of "The Strange Case of Donald J. Trump: A Psychological Reckoning." 

Dr. Gary Wood,  Vice Provost at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside.

Donald A. Norman, author of "The Design of Future Things." 

Part One:  Guida Brown, executive director of the Hope Council on Alcohol and other Drug Abuse."    Part Two: Kevin Sorbo, author of "True Strength:  My Journey from Hercules to Mere Mortal and how nearly dying saved my life." 

Part One: Tiffany Cross, author of "Say It Louder!- Black Voters, White Narratives, and Saving Our Democracy.  Part Two:  Jon Meacham, author of "Thomas Jefferson:  The Art of Power." 

Dr. Art Cyr - Clausen Distinguished Professor of Political Economy and World Business at Carthage College, offers analysis of current events.

Thomas W. Jones, author of "From Willard Straight to Wall Street: A Memoir." 

Lisa Boucher, author of "Raising the Bottom:  Making Mindful Choices in a Drinking Culture." 

Dr. Debbie Ford, Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside, talks about the school's plans for the fall semester amidst the ongoing challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Laurence Steinberg, author of "Age of Opportunity:  Lessons from the New Science of Adolescence."  

From the archives:  Joel Seidemann, author of "In the Interest of Justice: Great Opening and Closing Arguments of the Last 100 Years."  (from 2005)

 Barak Goodman, writer/producer/director for the American Experience two-part documentary "Clinton."  PBS is rebroadcasting this film July 21st and 28th.